Neil Pasricha, THE HAPPINESS EQUATION

Neil Pasricha, THE HAPPINESS EQUATION

Neil: After reviewing over three hundred positive psychology studies to write the book, I can now tell you without a shadow of a doubt that model is fundamentally reversed. Actually, we shouldn't tell our kids, “Great work leads to big success, leads to being happy.” We should say, “Being happy leads to doing great work, which leads to the big success.”

Julie Morgenstern, TIME TO PARENT

Julie Morgenstern, TIME TO PARENT

Julie: Time to Parent is basically a manual -- I think it’s the manual that's been missing from society for generations -- of how a parent can think about how to organize their time to cover everything that really needs to be done. We all want to be there for our kids but not lose ourselves in the process. We want to spend time in our relationships but also have time for ourselves. Parenting is the biggest, most challenging, most noble job in the world. There's never been a manual of how to manage your time.

Jennifer Blecher, OUT OF PLACE

Jennifer Blecher, OUT OF PLACE

Jennifer: Out of Place is the story of a twelve-year-old girl named Cove who lives on Martha’s Vineyard, which is an island off of Cape Code, with her mom. She's never left the island once in her entire life, which was fine with her until the day that her best friend Nina comes and tells Cove that Nina’s going to be moving to New York City with Nina’s two fathers. In that moment, Cove’s entire life feels like it’s falling apart. She has no idea how to make it better. It’s a story about friendship and mistakes and big acts of courage.

BONUS EPISODE: Nora McInerny on her non-profit, Still Kickin

BONUS EPISODE: Nora McInerny on her non-profit, Still Kickin

Watch a video from this interview here!

Nora: Still Kickin is a retail-based nonprofit, which means we primarily are a retail company. We sell these shirts and many other items. Most of them say Still Kickin, which is a shirt that you're holding, this kelly green shirt with weathered-looking letters that's a tracing of Aaron’s favorite shirt. He was wearing that the day that he had a seizure, which is the day that we found out that he had a brain tumor. We thought that was so funny. I remember walking into the ER. He was like, “Hey,” pointing at his shirt. I'm like, “What a shirt. What a great shirt. Let's bust you out of here.” It turns out it was really serious, what was happening to him. We didn't know. We were so oblivious. This was Aaron’s idea. All of it was Aaron’s idea. Almost right away when he found out he had cancer, he was like, “I want to recreate this shirt. I want to sell it. I want to give the money to people who really need it.”

Sheri Salata, THE BEAUTIFUL NO

Sheri Salata, THE BEAUTIFUL NO

Sheri: I had a front-row seat to all the most prolific wisdom-keepers of our time. I had the ride of my life. I found myself at fifty-six realizing that, with a rough, rocky start in my twenties, but by thirty-five I had finally manifested the beginnings of the career of my dreams. At fifty-six, the reckoning I had to do was that I hadn’t manifested the life of my dreams. One area, being someone else's something, someone's mother, someone's employee, someone's spouse or partner, that does not a full life make. I had to have a real moment with myself. I had to say, listen, I deserve to live the life of my dreams. Nobody knows more about making dreams come true than me.

Amanda Stern, LITTLE PANIC: Dispatches from an Anxious Life

Amanda Stern, LITTLE PANIC: Dispatches from an Anxious Life

Amanda Stern is the author of Little Panic: Dispatches from an Anxious Life, a memoir about her undiagnosed childhood panic disorder that takes place in New York City in the Etan Patz era. The subtitle, Dispatches from an Anxious Life, is only a small piece of the puzzle of how the course of Amanda's life was shaped. Listen and learn more about her compelling story.

Biz Ellis, YOU'RE DOING A GREAT JOB

Biz Ellis, YOU'RE DOING A GREAT JOB

Biz: I really felt like a lot of the books I read with my first child made me feel not necessarily comforted or confident about what was about to happen. A lot of books also made me feel like if you were nervous about it, then you were probably doing it wrong. I felt like I kept running into all these situations that were never spoken about in a book. Theresa, who cohosts the show with me, she and I would come in and start talking about something. More than once we'd say, “Why is this not in a book?” We wanted to make a book that reminded you no matter how you were doing it, if it was working, good job. [laughs] You’ve done it. You've discovered how to parent. That's basically why we made the book.