Camille Pagan, I'M FINE AND NEITHER ARE YOU

Camille Pagan, I'M FINE AND NEITHER ARE YOU

Camille: It’s going to happen. You're going to get older. You're going to look different. You might feel a little different. Staying connected to your purpose, for me at least, that's been really meaningful, to understand why I'm here and what I'm trying to do. That keeps you away from the mirror and the obsession that's so easy. You start seeing wrinkles. Everything's not holding up the same way. It’s a rabbit hole if you're not careful.

Falguni Kothari, THE OBJECT OF YOUR AFFECTIONS

Falguni Kothari, THE OBJECT OF YOUR AFFECTIONS

Falguni: . I didn't want the typical love trope, two women fighting over a man. That's so done. That's a trope that I don't really like. One of the things that happened was that I know a couple of women who have chosen to have a child through surrogacy. I was speaking to them. I was fascinated by how they came to that point where they needed to have a child through a surrogate. Plus, I have a lot of family in India. It’s actually very common over there for sisters-in-law to have a child for someone who cannot.

Kathy Wang, Family Trust

Kathy Wang, Family Trust

Kathy: It’s funny because I after I finished the book, you forget a lot about how much work it is. When I go back and read the entries from when I was writing it, I felt like a failure a lot of the time. I felt like the book was failing, that I was failing, that things weren’t working out, that there are these huge plot holes that I was not going to be able to figure out. My advice would be that when you're writing your book, you're going to feel that level of failure, and that the project can't be completed, and that there's no way that this is going to be publishable.

Delia Owens, WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING

Delia Owens, WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING

Delia: I've written poetry all my life. I'm not saying I'm good at it at all. Words just come to my mind a lot. I feel a lot when I write poetry. I feel that the words themselves can be so inspiring to readers. Most people who love good prose and literature, even if they don't have time or the inclination to read poetry, when they do read a verse, they feel a lot. That was the number one thing I wanted about this book. I wanted people to feel. Poetry makes you feel. You can get your thoughts into a few words. You can do it in a way that it’s like putting a drug straight into your bloodstream. You have to read a whole novel sometimes to feel certain things and get the point. A poem can say so much in a few words. That's a reason it’s so powerful.

Jennifer Miller & Jason Feifer, MR. NICE GUY

Jennifer Miller & Jason Feifer, MR. NICE GUY

Jennifer: Everybody fumbles. Everybody has really awkward sexual experiences, especially when they're younger. It’s honest putting that stuff in. I'm not sure that anything that we wrote about in the book actually happened to us in terms of the sex.

Natasha Solomons, House of Gold

Natasha Solomons, House of Gold

Natasha: I wanted the gardens of the Goldbaums to be an expression of character. Initially in the ghetto, the Jewish children were banned from the city parks. Jews weren’t allowed to have gardens. The first thing the Goldbaums do when they have money is they want to create these amazing gardens for their chateaus and their castles.

Min Jin Lee, Pachinko

Min Jin Lee, Pachinko

Min Jin Lee: In terms of when did decide I was a writer? I think you're a writer if you're writing. I don't think you're a writer because you're publishing. In terms of how you perceive your own talent level and your skill level, that takes a really long time. It does.